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time included members of labor unions, farm groups and civil rights organizations. included representative not just of the medical profession but of the people who need it and use health care. a woman named florence greenberg traveled from chicago, illinois to washington to offer her testimony. she was a member of the women's auxiliary of the steelworkers organizing committee, spending her days working in communities around the steel mills. greenberg told the audience at the national health conference that she had come to offer them a different picture of chicago. just steps away from the comfortable headquarters of the american medical association, tenements, a 6 chicago where people struggled with terrible health conditions related to poverty and unemployment and struggled to obtain basic medical care. greenberg told the conference of the grossly overcrowded county hospital, the city's only public hospital with local describes as a death house, a single overcrowded private hospital served the entire african-american community of the south side. chicago's outpatient clinics
events of the arab spring or the wisconsin statehouse or who lived through the civil rights movement or the anti-war movement of the '60s and the '70s can doubt their importance. in short, i think, we're going to have to put it all on the line. so allow me to conclude, if i can, by reading to you a few pages from the book. these are the -- this is a section that address how system change can come to america, and they reflect the theory of change that runs throughout the book. the journey to america the possible begins when enough americans have come to three important conclusions. the first is that something is powerfully wrong with our overall political economy. the operating system in which, on which our country now runs. that system is now routinely generating terrible results and is failing us across a broad front. the second conclusion follows from the first, it's the imperative of system change, of building a new political economy that routinely delivers good results for people in place and planet. and the third conclusion is that contrary to what one frequently hears, a better
to get them until the 70's for the most part. one of the great victories as it turns out of the civil rights movements and its impact on the democratic party a fiscal crisis with the state in the 1970's, a tax revolt, inflation, except for a. of finance and discipline. so you can have an expansion of state programs and more. the balance of forces. a great victory in the 1970's is to stop the banks redlining in terms of loans. community reinvestment act. a major reform. no question. you try to solve the terrible urban plight of the american city by giving the banks to lend and that integrate them into the financial system. very small at the stage. the kennedy reinvestment act is fairly kosher and terms of the way in which it's making those loans. by the 1990's, there is an explosion of mortgage debt and to black communities, enormous pride that the world is trying to buy secondary mortgages. the treasury proudly says so. and then every shares turned to business. the congressional inquiry and the crisis shows that 10,000 people in florida who were selling mortgages and florida have the
roosevelt on the other hand, a very strong proponent of civil rights and doing something to end racial discrimination so she continually prodded roosevelt to do something. he decided that he would have one of these new destroyer escorts be manned by an african-american crew. white officers in an african-american crew. they went off in the battle of the atlantic and in fact they were recommended, the team was recommended for the navy and accommodation by their white captains. the navy didn't want these people in the first place and so, they decided they weren't going to give them accommodation. accommodation was not given to the surviving crewmembers, so 50 years later president clinton gave them their award. if you look at the ship and you think about it, the over 200 people in a of 35 feet wide and 200 feet long, it's pretty tight accommodations and if you look in the bunk room, you will see that there really aren't enough bunks for all the people. so you know, it was a tough situation, especially they would be out on the water for months at a time. they were smaller ships, so on the
pherson "war on the waters" and craig, the civil war at sea, very handsomely done, are both out. that's good because we get to resume our -- we barely scratched the surface. let's get right to it because we spoke for an hour last time, we got to about january 1862. so i will assume you all know about 1861, and get to something that jim pointed out. that was rather interesting. is that 150 years ago this month, besides all the other things that were going on, the realization that lincoln had promulgated -- [inaudible] the union had commenced -- the tennessee cumberland and mississippi rivers seems to belong to the north, not the south. and i must've seen for a time in 1862 that the combination of events, particularly the successes of the union were about to end the war between the states. and then the trend line shifts. being the father of water that lincoln was now became vexed all over again. jim talent start with you. what happened and why? >> well, the union navy was on a roll in the fall and winter of 61 and 62, in the spring of 62. and it looked like they were going to open up the missi
segments of palestinian civil society including unions, all major political parties, human rights organizations and more. the growing global bds movement is a thriving, diverse and inclusive movement. it is strategic in nature, empowering groups around the world to choose targets and tactics that are appropriate within each particular context. it stands on three pillars; freedom, equality and justice. representing the three rights articulated in the call, the three minimal components to fulfilling palestinians' most fundamental rights. the movement has had tremendous success so far with victories announced weekly or sometimes daily from around the world growing in size and significance. most recently in the u.s., for example, the quaker friends fiduciary corporation which manages investments for more than 250 quaker institutions around the country decided to divest from caterpillar, violia and hewlett-packard. [applause] following concerns expressed by a palestine/israel action group. earlier this year msci delisted caterpillar from its list of socially-responsible investments pro
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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